Author Archives: maplesugarkat

Lewis Hine at NYPL. Newsies and more

Italian boy of 12 working as job printer. by Lewis Hine from NYPL digital collections. 1913

Italian boy of 12 working as job printer. by Lewis Hine from NYPL digital collections. 1913

Lewis Hine taught photography at the Ethical Culture school and published photographs of child labor for the Survey Graphic and other Progressive Era publications. His work for the National Child Labor Committee includes famous shots of newsies. This 1913 image of a boy in a print shop is from the New York Public Library online collections.

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Showering Jean Cole w. 1812 Bank Notes

Jean Cole & Bank Notes

Jean Cole & Bank Notes

During walking tour of Melville’s Seaport a stop at Wall St. & Broad St. In front of Federal Hall, formerly the Federal Reserve. An augmented reality app delivered via smart phone inserts period 1812 bank notes into scene. Created by public historian Kathleen Hulser and locative code artist Steve Bull, this War of 1812, project brought archival images into public space. They appear with GPS coordinates with the free Junaio app on the “Cutter v. Smuggler 1813” channel and work on tablets, iPhones and androids. This is a way to activate period image doing history on the hoof. You can take a photo like this which layers period source on site with current scene and person.

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Fair Use and Copyright

Pat Aufderheide has long helped filmmakers figure out some of the intricacies of fair use. Here she talks about using images and the law. Interview with Pat Aufderheide discussing common questions  Talk on Fair Use. Pat Aufderheide

See College Art Association website on Code of Best practices  http://www.collegeart.org/fair-use/  Code of Best Practices Code of Best Practices. CAA

Discussion by Auferderheide and others Report on Issues Copyright & Fair Use

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Analyzing Print Visualizations w. Janice Simon

Janice Simon at periodical workshop at Baruch College

Janice Simon at periodical workshop at Baruch College

Great talk and hands-on Workshop w. Janice Simon

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Urban Picturesque and the Spectacle of Americanization — Historicizing Voyeurism on Inequality

Woodcut, 1870. Rag-Picker New York

Woodcut, 1870. Rag-Picker New York

“The immigrant traversed the city rather than the pastoral landscape gleaning the remains of overproduction in the shadow of opulence.” Carrie Tirado Bramen “The Urban Picturesque and the Spectacle of Americanization”

This quote resonates as I look out my window on a Harlem street and hear the chatter of tourists snapping selfies from the double-decker tour bus, treating the neighborhood here as part of their modern New York experience of the urban picturesque. They note with pleasure the shopping cart men going through the great trash piles on garbage day before Sanitation does its route. Not inequality but “interesting street life, full of character and characters” best observed from seat in bus. Sometimes we wave back, wondering if they realize they are treating our lives and bodies as human zoo, for their voyeuristic delight.

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Periodical Dig at N-YHS

Fun with Old Publications Day — we saw mammoth sheets, pocket books and some sparkling cover art.

MariamToubaAdamMcKible

Ayendy Bonifacio, Mariam Touba, Adam McKible

Mariam Touba, periodicals librarian at New-York Historical Society led us on a merry dance through periodicals in NY from the very earliest to NY Post Headline about the Blackout of 2003. She noted that the New-York Historical Society collections held a coveted V1, N.1 New-York Times which the company does not itself own. And that the microfilm of the New-York Evening Post from July 1804 containing a surprisingly short notice of the dueling death of its founder Alexander Hamilton had gone missing, although we got to see the actual issue. The notice was on the inside pages, with the most “important” news on the front, e.g. shipments of cotton from Sea Islands in Georgia and coffee, arriving from places like Port-au-Prince, see image. This surprised me due to recent victory in 1804 revolution there, not too many former slaves felt like raising the old crops in Haiti. The handwritten manuscript “Incidents and Sketches Among the Newsboys” 1855 included the Song of the Newsboys, beginning on the cheerful narcissistic note common to lads through the ages  “hurrah for ourselves.” We know from Vincent DiGirolamo’s talk later in the day, that often the newsboys had only themselves for cheer.

Sandra Roff on the Ladies

Sandra Roff on the Ladies

Green Coffee from Port-au-Prince

Green Coffee from Port-au-Prince

ladiesgentspocketmag

Ladie’s and Gentlemen’s Pocket Magazine

Song of the Newsboys, 1855

Song of the Newsboys, 1855

Sandra Roff led us through ladies’ publications, starting with some in colonial era, such as Ladie’s and Gentleman’s Pocket Magazine. The cover illustration suggested reading while reclining under a tree in empire style dress might be enlightening, indeed. How could we fail to agree? I especially appreciated the motto of 1801 New York publication, The Ladies Monitor “to improve the mind and also to amuse.”

A Prohibition-era issue of the original Life magazine featured a John Held cover with risque dancing flappers and advertised an advice article on Alibis — obviously a good way to sell copies in 1927.

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