Author Archives: Ayendy Bonifacio

The Early Poems of Sarah Morgan Bryan (Piatt) in The New York Ledger, 1857-1860 (Sarah Piatt Recovery Project)

Screen Shot 2020-06-29 at 4.23.32 PMThe Early Poems of Sarah Morgan Bryan (Piatt) in the New York Ledger, 1857-1860 is a DH project that I started in 2015 with my advisor Elizabeth Renker during the first City of Print institute. The site is now LIVE: https://kb.osu.edu/handle/1811/87056

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The New York Times’ Short Take on Newspaper Row

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On Jan. 24, 2020, The New York Times published a series of sketches and photos of sites in lower Manhattan that have changed over time. Newspaper Row was one of the sites mentioned. Above is a photograph of newies peddling newspaper in front of The Tribune building. This image recalls Vincent’s and Kelley’s great talks on newsies and the Park Row, respectively.

Here’s the link to the article: “5 Sites That Show How Much Lower Manhattan Has Changed”

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How Did We Get Here? 163 years of The Atlantic’s writing on race and racism in America

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On June 16, 2020, The Atlactic shared select archival publications on race and racism spanning the magazine’s 163 years of publication. I thought that this resource might be of general interest to the City of Print community as we examine and discuss periodicals history and culture, the current moment of anti-racist protests, and the roles magazines play(ed) in race-making.

Link: https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2020/06/atlantic-reader-race-and-racism-us/613057/

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American Periodical Poetry Facebook

For those of you interested in periodical poetry, please follow my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/American-Periodical-Poetry/963668403652726

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Photography Blog

I’ve created a simple blog for all of the photos I took on my camera. Enjoy!

http://cityofprint.weebly.com/

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Fires on Newspaper Row

After our Park Row tour this afternoon, I began thinking about how often fires consumed publishing sites during the midcentury and how this ordeal was a major concern for editors, writers, and subscribers. I know from my research on Robert E. Bonner’s New York Ledger that the building housing the Ledger on 48 Ann St. burned down in 1860, taking with it a number of letters and manuscripts only five years after the paper’s debut. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle provided a list of the “principal sufferers” affected by the fire (see figure 1). The story was also covered by The Times (see figure 2). I found another example in the January 4, 1860 issue of The Tribune, a short blurb about a fire that consumed a “Paper Warehouse Removal” company owned by Buckley, Brother & Co. (see figure 3). Although these are just a couple of examples, such fires were very common and many publishing houses were anxious about losing their businesses to fires, an anxiety insurance agencies and contractors capitalized on. For example, in the April 11, 1860 issue of The Times  an advertisement appeared for iron and hardware (see figure 4). The company maintains that their iron is fireproof and the same type used to build the structures housing The Times, The Tribune, as well a number of banks in the city. This ad’s audience is clearly the publishing houses. It’s interesting to learn that these fires generated so much business in New York City.

Times Fire (figure 1)

(Figure 1)

Times Fire (figure 2)

(Figure 2)

Warhouse Fire (figure 3)

(Figure 3)

Fire Proof Iron add (figure 4)

(Figure 4)

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Genius Scan: PDF Scanner

Those of you who are photographing archival materials with your smartphones or tablets might find the Genius Scan app on iTunes helpful. Genius Scan allows you to turn images into PDFs and transfer files to Google Drive, Dropbox, and a number of other online depositories. There is even an option called OCR (optical character recognition) that transcribes your PDFs, making then keyword searchable. Here is a link to the app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/genius-scan-pdf-scanner/id377672876?mt=8OCR

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